Religion Program Events

Upcoming Events

There are no upcoming events to display.

Past Events

          

2015

Monday, November 16, 2015

"Are We All Merchants? Buddhism, Mercantilism, and Moral Economics in Early India"

Olin, Room 204  6:00 pm
Andy Rotman
Professor of Religion
Smith College
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Luke Thompson  845-758-7384  lthompso@bard.edu
  Monday, November 2, 2015

Queer Jewish Heroes and Scoundrels

A talk on issues of sexual identity and Jewish tradition featuring two leading queer rabbis.
Olin Language Center, Room 115  8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Rabbi Kerry Chaplin of Vassar College and Rabbi Steve Greenberg will speak about the complicated relationships, past, present, and future, between Judaism and the LGBTQ world. This event is co-sponsored by Religion, Jewish Stduies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, the JSO, the QSA, Trans Life Collective, and the Center for Spiritual Life. Dessert will be served.
Sponsored by: Chaplaincy; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Dr. Margo Machida
Professor of Art History & Asian American Studies
University of Connecticut

Trans-Pacific Visions in Asian American Art
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:30 pm
This talk focuses on the Asia Pacific region and selected works by contemporary U.S.-based Asian American artists that engage themes of trans-Pacific circulation and global systems of cross-cultural exchange. Based on Dr. Machida’s current research in Hawai’i, this talk draws attention to islands as a generative framework to analyze and to compare art in the Asia Pacific region and the Americas. The Pacific, with more islands than the world’s other oceans combined, is above all an island realm. Accordingly Islands and associated oceanic imaginaries exert a powerful hold on works by artists who trace their ancestral origins to coastal East and Southeast Asia and Oceania.  All are invited to this talk about these exciting contemporary artists.

Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Art History Program; Asian Studies; Religion Program
Contact: Tom Wolf  845-758-7158  wolf@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Sufism.com: Virtual Expressions of American Islam

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  5:30 pm
Robert Rozehnal
Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Global Islamic Studies, Lehigh University
Within the 'spiritual marketplace' of American religious life, Cyberspace offers tech-savvy Muslims an alternative platform for narratives, networking and ritual experience.  Since the adoption of the printing press, Sufis have demonstrated a remarkable ability to adopt and adapt to emerging media technologies.  Even so, the use of the Internet by global Sufi communities remains largely unexplored by academic scholarship.  Drawing on new research, this presentation examines how several distinct American Sufi orders utilize Cyberspace as a unique mediascape for the refashioning of authority, identity and ritual performance.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Experimental Humanities Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Tehseen Thaver  845-758-7207  tthaver@bard.edu
Monday, October 5, 2015

Gandhi and Forgiveness

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm
Dennis Dalton
Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Barnard College, and author of Mahatma Gandhi: Nonviolent Power in Action and several other books.

The value of forgiveness was central to Gandhi's teaching as well as to his effectiveness as the leader of India's independence movement. The lecture will describe specific cases where Gandhi demonstrated its power throughout his career, from 1919 to 1947. In the broadest sense, the virtue of forgiveness has an enduring and universal meaning so the lecture starts with its recent expression by members of Emmanuel Church in Charleston and includes commentary on Martin Luther King's teaching. This shows its relevance to conflict resolution in America today. From this cross cultural narrative comes the question of what we may learn from Gandhi's example about the redeeming force of forgiveness?
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program; Human Rights Program; Religion Program
Contact: Richard Davis  845-758-7364  rdavis@bard.edu
  Thursday, September 3, 2015

Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session

RKC 103  4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Interested in applying for a Fulbright Grant, a Watson Fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of these two sessions!
Contact: David Shein  845-758-7454  shein@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Sufism in North America

Reem-Kayden Center, Room 101  5:00 pm
Shobhana Xavier
PhD Candidate at Wilfrid Laurier-Waterloo University
in the Religion and Culture DepartmentSufism in America forms a formative current of Islamic and non-Islamic spirituality and religiosity. In the American context Sufism was present ritually among some early African American indentured slaves of the 17th century, while Sufism’s Persian poetic traditions were influential in the circles of American literary masters, such as the Transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson. But the systemic proliferation of Sufism is often cited as emerging with the arrival of Hazrat Inayat Khan (d. 1927) in 1910. Sufi communities have now institutionalized and are seminal manifestations of Islam and spirituality across America. As the demographics of Sufi communities transform in the 21st century in America, these movements are also contending with issues of authority, gender and legitimacy. How are issues of legitimacy of Sufism within Islam or the role of women in Sufi American movements being negotiated? How is the role of the classical Sufi shaykh (master) unfolding in the American context? As a means to explore these questions within the development of Sufism in North America, this talk situates the historical development of Sufism in America and then uses the case study of the Bawa Muhaiyaddeen Fellowship, which is headquartered in Philadelphia with transnational connections to Sri Lanka, to explore how these negotiations are unfolding in one particular Sufi community and what this can tell us about Sufism in America, but also Sufism in contemporary global contexts.
Sponsored by: Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Tehseen Thaver  845-758-7207  tthaver@bard.edu
Thursday, April 9, 2015

Film Screening: Tibetan Stories

Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Screening of Tibetan Stories, followed by a panel discussion, with film maker Russell Avery, Lama Tenzin Yignyen, who is creating a sand mandala in the RKC, Tuesday April 7-11, Rae Erin Dachille-Hey, Instructor of 
Religion, and Kay Larson, art critic and author. Moderated by Tatjana Myoko v. Prittwitz, Buddhist Associate Chaplain


Sponsored by: Religion Program
Contact: Tatjana Myoko v. Prittwitz  845-752-4619  gaffron@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 9, 2015

Open Sounds, Hidden Spaces: Listening, Wandering, and Spatial Formation in Sufi Iran

with Seema Golestaneh
Olin, Room 101  6:00 pm
As the Iranian authorities continue to frown upon public gatherings, Sufi Orders have sought alternative methods of convening while still complying with city regulations. One informal Sufi group in the city of Isfahan does so by meeting in private homes and rotating locations each week. Rather than circulate the specific address of a meeting place, however, the mystics instead instruct the others to meet at a nearby intersection, and then broadcast music from a courtyard or house to alert the members to the exact location. This in turn allows them to locate the site by listening for and ultimately “following” the sounds. It is in this way that the Sufis utilize the practice of intentional listening (sama) and mystical ideals of wandering to navigate the politics of Iranian urban space. This talk will hence examine the utilization of mystical epistemologies to lead to the emergence of an alternative Islamic space in post-revolutionary Iran.
 
Sponsored by: Anthropology Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins  845-758-7201  sstamato@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 – Saturday, April 11, 2015

Impermanence: Sand Mandala

Reem-Kayden Center  9:00 am
Tuesday, April 7 - Saturday, April 11
RKC Lobby
Closing Ceremony and Procession to waterfall: 
April 11 at noon

Screening of short films from "Tibetan Stories"
Thursday, April 9, 7-9 pm. Weis Cinema
followed by a panel discussion with film maker Russell Avery, Lama Tenzin Yignyen, Rae Erin Dachille-Hey and Kay Larson.

Free and open to the public

The Venerable Lama Tenzin Yignen, Tibetan Buddhist monk from the Dalai Lama’s home monastery Namgyal and professor at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, will install a sand mandala, a “cosmic diagram that represents the dwelling place or celestial mansion” of the Buddha of Compassion, over the course of six days.  Just when it is complete, the mandala will be ritually cut, swept together, and taken in procession down to the river in this performed lesson on impermanence. 


Sponsored by: Religion Program
Contact: Richard Davis  845-758-7364  rdavis@bard.edu
  Monday, April 6, 2015

CCE In the News Series Panel: The Portrayal of Muslims in the Media

Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  6:00 pm – 8:15 pm
As the next installment of the Center for Civic Enagegment panel discussion series we will be unpacking the possible issues surrounding and arising from the portrayal of American Muslims in the media.

Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement
Contact: Abiba Salahou  315-807-7648  as3957@bard.edu
  Friday, April 3, 2015

Passover Seder

Kline, Faculty Dining Room  6:15 pm
This year's Passover seder will take place on Friday evening, April 3, at 6:15 pm in the Faculty Dining Room. There is no charge and all are invited, but you must sign up by Tuesday, March 31. To sign up, click on the following link and answer the six simple questions:
Bard College Passover Seder Registration 2015

Chag samneach (happy holiday)!
Contact: David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
  Friday, April 3, 2015

Good Friday Service

worship service
Chapel of the Holy Innocents  12:00 pm – 12:45 pm
Good Friday worship service
Sponsored by: Chaplaincy
Contact: Ginger Grab  845-757-4309  ggrab@bard.edu
  Friday, March 27, 2015

Shabbat Service and Dinner

All are welcome!
Beit Shalom-Salam (Basement of Village A)  6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Join us for an informal evening service at 6:30 and a home-made vegetarian Shabbat dinner at 7:30. All are warmly invited to attend -- no experience necessary!

NOTE: Next week, Friday April 3, there will be NO reguilar Shabbat. Instead we will celebrate Passover with our Passover Seder. Register for the Seder by using this link:  Bard College Passover Seder Registration 2015
Contact: David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
Thursday, March 26, 2015

Film: Passing Ellenville

Campus Center, Weis Cinema  8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Passing Ellenville is an indepent flim by Gene Fisher that was screened at the 2014 World Wide Film Festivals. The film features two transgendered young adults in Ellenville in Ulster County. The filmakers and Film stars will be in attendance for a brief Q & A after the film.

Movie trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzsbuGYCTJc

Contact: Rebecca Jane Stacy  845-758-7577  stacy@bard.edu
  Thursday, March 26, 2015

Keeping Practitioners Engaged: Dealing with Failure, Sustaining Commitment and Cultivating the Spiritual Self

Erin Johnston
Department of Sociology
Princeton University

Olin 307  1:30 pm
Perceived failures and shortcomings abound in the process of spiritual formation: spiritual experiences are few and far between, progress is difficult to evaluate, and the lofty ideals of the aspired-to spiritual identity are unachievable for the majority of practitioners. In addition, training programs in spiritual disciplines such as yoga and meditation explicitly encourage practitioners to identify and acknowledge their failures and shortcomings both within and outside of formal practice. Given the frequency of these experiences and the well-known tendency for repeated failures to elicit exit, why do people continue to engage in these practices? Drawing from case studies of two organizations dedicated to the transmission of personal spiritual disciplines – an Integral Yoga studio and a Catholic prayer house – I examine how teachers and students interpret, account for, and respond to perceived shortcoming in the course of training. In this talk, I will argue that these communities encourage what I call a compassionate growth model in relation to experiences of perceived failure: an ideal typical discourse which normalizes, universalizes, and even valorizes failure, and which balances internal and external attributions in accounting for these experiences. In addition, I will show how practitioners struggle to not only enact but to fully internalize this perspective, and demonstrate the important role that interaction with fellow journeymen plays in the iterative process of failure, interpretation and persistence. Finally, I will argue that the official, socially-sanctioned approach to failure becomes a key element in the definition, performance, and identification of the spiritual self, serving as a marker of commitment and authenticity and distinguishing members and the community from culturally relevant others.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Sociology Program
Contact: Yuval Elmelech  845-758-7547  elmelech@bard.edu
Monday, March 23, 2015

In the News Series: Panel Discussion on the Portrayal of Muslims in the Media

Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
The panelists will include:

Iskandar Atajanow, Bard College Muslim Chaplain

Ian Buruma, Bard College Human Rights and Journalism professor

Sarah Egan, Bard College Science, Technology, and Society professor of sociology

Dr Umar Ahmad, one of the Presidents of Masjid an Noor in Poughkeepsie

Refreshments Provided!

Sponsored by: Muslim Student Organization
Contact: Jono Naito  jnaito@bard.edu
  Friday, March 20, 2015

The Institute of Advanced Theology 2015 Lenten Lecture Series title: "Jesus: in his own terms"

Chapel of the Holy Innocents  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
The Institute of Advanced Theology will host the 2015 Lenten Lecture Series, "Jesus: in his own terms," led by Bruce Chilton.  A brief descrition follows.

Research during the past two decades has brought Jesus into focus as a rabbi within Judaism, whose influence produced a new religious system.  The series this Lent will identify five new insights, confirmed by the most recent scholarship, which illuninate the emergence and the future of Christianity as never before.

The IAT Lenten lecture series will be held on the following five Fridays: February 27, March 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th at the Bard College Chapel of the Holy Innocents. 

The presentation is free and will begin at 12:30 p.m. followed by a question and answer period. 

Lunch will be at noon. For lunch, we will be providing box lunches, and there will be a cost that will be determined at a later time.  Lunch reservations are required and can be made by calling 845-758-7279.



Sponsored by: Institute of Advanced Theology
Contact: Theresa Desmond  845-758-7279  desmond@bard.edu
  Friday, March 13, 2015

The Institute of Advanced Theology 2015 Lenten Lecture Series title: "Jesus: in his own terms"

Chapel of the Holy Innocents  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
The Institute of Advanced Theology will host the 2015 Lenten Lecture Series, "Jesus: in his own terms," led by Bruce Chilton.  A brief descrition follows.

Research during the past two decades has brought Jesus into focus as a rabbi within Judaism, whose influence produced a new religious system.  The series this Lent will identify five new insights, confirmed by the most recent scholarship, which illuninate the emergence and the future of Christianity as never before.

The IAT Lenten lecture series will be held on the following five Fridays: February 27, March 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th at the Bard College Chapel of the Holy Innocents. 

The presentation is free and will begin at 12:30 p.m. followed by a question and answer period. 

Lunch will be at noon. For lunch, we will be providing box lunches, and there will be a cost that will be determined at a later time.  Lunch reservations are required and can be made by calling 845-758-7279.



Sponsored by: Institute of Advanced Theology
Contact: Theresa Desmond  845-758-7279  desmond@bard.edu
  Friday, March 6, 2015

The Institute of Advanced Theology 2015 Lenten Lecture Series title: "Jesus: in his own terms"

Chapel of the Holy Innocents  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
The Institute of Advanced Theology will host the 2015 Lenten Lecture Series, "Jesus: in his own terms," led by Bruce Chilton.  A brief descrition follows.

Research during the past two decades has brought Jesus into focus as a rabbi within Judaism, whose influence produced a new religious system.  The series this Lent will identify five new insights, confirmed by the most recent scholarship, which illuninate the emergence and the future of Christianity as never before.

The IAT Lenten lecture series will be held on the following five Fridays: February 27, March 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th at the Bard College Chapel of the Holy Innocents. 

The presentation is free and will begin at 12:30 p.m. followed by a question and answer period. 

Lunch will be at noon. For lunch, we will be providing box lunches, and there will be a cost that will be determined at a later time.  Lunch reservations are required and can be made by calling 845-758-7279.



Sponsored by: Institute of Advanced Theology
Contact: Theresa Desmond  845-758-7279  desmond@bard.edu
  Monday, March 2, 2015

Why Does the Chinese Leadership Quote Confucius?

A lecture by Dr. Jyrki Kallio
Hegeman 102  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
What is behind the revival of tradition in modernizing China?

The presentation discusses the various interpretations of Confucianism which have prevailed during different historical eras, as well as the contemporary significance of Confucianism in China, East Asia, and the world.

Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program; Chinese Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Li-hua Ying  845-758-7545  ying@bard.edu
  Friday, February 27, 2015

The Institute of Advanced Theology 2015 Lenten Lecture Series title: "Jesus: in his own terms"

Chapel of the Holy Innocents  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
The Institute of Advanced Theology will host the 2015 Lenten Lecture Series, "Jesus: in his own terms," led by Bruce Chilton.  A brief descrition follows.

Research during the past two decades has brought Jesus into focus as a rabbi within Judaism, whose influence produced a new religious system.  The series this Lent will identify five new insights, confirmed by the most recent scholarship, which illuninate the emergence and the future of Christianity as never before.

The IAT Lenten lecture series will be held on the following five Fridays: February 27, March 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th at the Bard College Chapel of the Holy Innocents. 

The presentation is free and will begin at 12:30 p.m. followed by a question and answer period. 

Lunch will be at noon. For lunch, we will be providing box lunches, and there will be a cost that will be determined at a later time.  Lunch reservations are required and can be made by calling 845-758-7279.



Sponsored by: Institute of Advanced Theology
Contact: Theresa Desmond  845-758-7279  desmond@bard.edu
Thursday, February 26, 2015

"Becoming Shia: Ritual, Sacred Space, and Memory in the Early Muslim World"
(New time & Location)

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm
Najam I. Haider
Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion
Barnard College
The Shi‘i School represents one of the two major divisions within Islam, the other being the majority Sunni school.The Sunni-Shi'a division first materialized in the 8th century in the important Iraqi city of Kufa. This talk will explore the birth and development of Shi'i identity.  Specifically, it will explore how the early Shi‘a carved out an independent communal identity through distinctive ritual practices and within separate sacred spaces. In doing so, it will address two seminal controversies in the study of early Islam, namely, when and how the Shi‘a came to see themselves as a distinctive community. It will also address the important connection between narrative and memory in the history of religious communities.
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Medieval Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Tehseen Thaver  845-758-7207  tthaver@bard.edu
Sunday, February 15, 2015

Make a Joyful Noise!

A Service of Celebration and Remembrance
Chapel of the Holy Innocents  4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
The Community Church at Bard will host a worship service in honor of Black History Month - "Make a Joyful Noise!: A Service of Celebration and Remembrance” - on Sunday, February 15, 2015 at 4pm in the Bard Chapel of the Holy Innocents. This program will feature readings and music drawn from a range of Africa-American church and social justice traditions. Following the service there will be a community pot-luck supper. All are welcome!

Guest speaker for this event will be Jason Craige Harris.

An educator, speaker, writer, and minister, Jason Craige Harris specializes in matters related to spirituality, ethics, justice, and knowledge activism. He is an instructor at Friends Seminary in NYC where he teaches the craft of written expression and how to observe religious and ethical systems critically. Mr. Harris also serves on the board of Postcolonial Networks, where he facilitates conversations on religion, violence, decolonization, and democracy.
 
Sponsored by: Chaplaincy
Contact: Nicholas Lewis  845-752-4775  nlewis@bard.edu
  Saturday, February 14, 2015 – Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Call for Artistic Submissions by Bard College Students

Chaplaincy: Center for Spiritual Life – Embellishment
Resnick Commons  The Center for Spiritual Life is located in the basement of Village Dorm A and hosts a space used by the Jewish community celebrating Shabbat and other activities, the Buddhist Meditation Room, the Luqman Hall for the prayer of Muslim students, the Center for the Study of James the Brother, and a kosher/halal vegetarian kitchen. The space is also used by other spiritual groups like the Bard Christian Fellowship, the Hindu Student Organization, Earth-based practices, for the discussion series “What do you believe?” and A Space Underground, a substance-free social space Friday and Saturday nights.

The chaplaincy is seeking to decorate the walls of the common area in order to reflect the various spiritual paths on campus. We are welcoming any media and size (please visit the space in order to find out about possible dimensions), but are looking for an active reflection of the Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, and any other faith tradition – covering the range from explicit symbolic depiction to abstract collages incorporating various faiths.

Ten art works will be selected with an award of $500 each. Funding for the awardees is provided by the Anna Jones Fellowship. The works will be displayed during the Baccalaureate in May, prior to their installation at the Center for Spiritual Life.

Deadline for proposals is April 1, 2015. Please submit a digital photo of the artwork, plus an artist statement (500 words) explaining your approach and intention.

The judges include Hap Tivey, artist in residence at the Fine Arts Department, the Bard chaplaincy, and student representatives from the spiritual groups. The competition is overseen by Tatjana Myoko v. Prittwitz, Buddhist Associate Chaplain, who graduated from the Center for Curatorial Studies in 1999, worked there as a Curatorial Archivist for almost 10 years, specialized in her PhD on spiritual, contemporary art, and who is also an artist.

For further questions please contact Tatjana Myoko v. Prittwitz.

Sponsored by: Chaplaincy
Contact: Tatjana Myoko v. Prittwitz  845-752-4619  gaffron@bard.edu
  Friday, February 13, 2015

Shabbat

Come build a palace in time!
Beit Shalom-Salam (Basement of Village A)  6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
A great 20th century Jewish thinker (Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel) said that all week long we focus on "stuff" -- building it, acquiring it, fixing it, obssessing over it. Shabbat, he said, is dedicated to ignoring stuff and focusing on time. Join us for Shabbat services (6:30) and a home-cooked vegetarian dinner (7:30) as we luxuriate in spending time with one another, and relish the warmth of a very caring community! All are welcome to attend!
Contact: David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
  Friday, February 13, 2015

Walk and Vigil in Remembrance of Victims of Chapel Hill Shooting

Village G  6:00 pm
On Tuesday, February 10th, 3 Muslims were shot and killed at Chapel Hill in North Carolina. A woman, her husband, and student. The local and national news were exceedingly slow to react on the tragedy and only began to give the story minor attention after Muslims non-Muslims took their frustration to social media and tweeted "#MuslimLivesMatter". Their outcries were heard across the country and despite this, so many are still silent. When a Muslim is being accused of a terrorist attack, it makes national news in seconds, however when Muslims are killed who speaks up?

Many students have spoken up about wanting to bring this issue to attention and we've come together to organize a peaceful walk on campus this Friday (February 13th) at 6 pm.

We will meet in front of Village G on Central Campus where we will then walk, holding signs and posters, to the front of the Campus Center. Here we will have a candle lighting and gather in a few minutes of silence for the victims who were murdered. Students may speak up and share their thoughts and after we will orderly disperse. The whole demonstration will be less than an hour. We encourage faculty and students to join together and show that Muslim Lives Matter.

Feel free to make posters, flyers, etc and share this event with everyone you know on campus.

Please contact the people below if you are interested in helping.

Abiba Salahou as3957@bard.edu
Sabrina Sultana ss7161@bard.edu
Salim Chagui sc8664@bard.edu
Claire Harvey ch5031@bard.edu

Sponsored by: Muslim Student Organization
Contact: 845-758-6822 
  Thursday, February 12, 2015

"Guardians of the Refuge: Monks, Politics, and Violence in Sri Lanka"

Hegeman 102  5:00 pm
Jonathan A. Young, Ph.D.
College of the Holy Cross

"Guardians of the Refuge: Monks, Politics, and Violence in Sri Lanka"

When considering the relationship between religion and violence, Buddhism is often noted as an exception. Yet, evidence from various regions of the Buddhist world reveals that the tradition, unfortunately, shows no immunity to violence. This talk explores the careers of politically engaged Buddhist monks in contemporary Sri Lanka, discusses the conflicts they have perpetuated, and considers what the Sri Lankan case contributes to a broader understanding of religion, politics, and violence in our world.




Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Religion Program
Contact: Richard Davis  845-758-7364  clockel@bard.edu
  Monday, February 2, 2015

What do YOU believe?

An opportunity for students, staff, and faculty to discuss personal beliefs of all sorts
Center for Spiritual Life (Basement of Village A)  8:30 pm – 10:00 pm
Join us for the next round of "What do YOU believe" in which all members of the Bard community have an opportunity to share and discuss their personal beliefs, be they religious, philosophical, artistic, political, or anything else. This session's special guest will be Kolrick "Kole" Greathouse. Refreshments will be served! This monthly event is sponsored by the Chaplaincy.
Contact: David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
  Monday, February 2, 2015

Religion Colloquium

Olin, Room 101  5:00 pm
Annabella C. Pitkin, Ph.D.
Barnard College, Columbia University
will give a talk

“THE MEMORY OF MIRACLES: MODES OF TIBETAN BUDDHIST POWER”Accounts of holy individuals who display miraculous abilities appear frequently in Tibetan Buddhist literature, and remain popular among Tibetan Buddhists today. This talk examines the significance of miracle narratives in the life story of one twentieth century Tibetan Buddhist master. Contemporary Tibetan Buddhists remember and interpret his miracles in ways that reveal multiple Buddhist understandings of faith, reason, and power, and suggest the potential of Buddhist contributions to debates about religion and secularism in the modern world.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Religion Program
Contact: Richard Davis  845-758-7364  rdavis@bard.edu
  Saturday, January 31, 2015

Vigil of Remembrance

Chapel of the Holy Innocents  6:00 pm
Beginning at this season last year, our community suffered brutal losses. Evelina Brown, Sarah McCausland, Mark Becker, and Lizzie Stimson all gave of their vibrant talents and passions in a way that helped the rest of us grow. The loss to their families exceeds ours, but our recognition of them helps to heal all those who loved them.

We invite you to join the Chaplaincy in a Vigil of Remembrance on Saturday, 31 January at 6:00 in the Chapel of the Holy Innocents. If you cannot attend, please take a moment at that time to recollect those whom we have lost.

Sponsored by: Chaplaincy
Contact: Bruce Chilton  845-758-6822  chilton@bard.edu