Religion Program Events

Monday, April 15, 2019

Text Unbound: (Re-)Imagining the Talmud


Judaism is often thought of as a religion of the book, and the most influential book in the Jewish canon is the Talmud—a famously complex, genre-defying text that has been at the center of Jewish life and learning since the Middle Ages. Nowadays, the Talmud is most often encountered in book form, typically in large tomes whose pages are imprinted with an iconic, typeset design. And yet the Talmud is considered to be the culmination of Judaism’s Oral Torah, and it was produced and originally transmitted orally by rabbis living in late antique Iraq. 

This workshop will gather scholars, artists, a printer, a digitalist, and a performer to consider the many manifestations of this classical work and related Jewish textualities, from late antique graffiti and lament; to contemporary fiction, illustration, and printing; to the virtual universes of digitization and the internet, and experimental voice art. These explorations bear relevance not only for Jewish Studies, but also for broader matters such as the study of writing and orality, and the future of the book in the digital age.
 
Participants
Zachary Braiterman is professor of religion in the Department of Religion at Syracuse University.

Jessica Tamar Deutsch is a New York based artist. In 2017, she published The Illustrated Pirkei Avot: A Graphic Novel of Jewish Ethics.

Victoria Hanna is a Jerusalem based composer, creator, performer, researcher, and teacher of voice and language.

Galit Hasan-Rokem is a poet, translator, and Grunwald Professor of Folklore and Professor of Hebrew Literature (emerita) at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Scott-Martin Kosofsky is an award-winning printer, book designer, and typography expert based in Rhinebeck.

Ruby Namdar is an Israeli novelist based in New York City. His novel The Ruined House (Harper, 2018) won the Sapir Prize, Israel’s most prestigious prize in Hebrew literature.

Jonathan Rosen is a writer and essayist, and wrote The Talmud and the Internet (Picador, 2000). He is the editorial director of Nextbook Press.

Karen B. Stern is associate professor of history at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. 

Shai Secunda holds the Jacob Neusner chair in Jewish Studies at Bard College.

Sara Tillinger Wolkenfeld is the director of education at Sefaria.org.


Time: 11:45 am – 6:00 pm
Location: Multiple Locations
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Past Events

              

2012

  Friday, December 7, 2012 – Saturday, December 15, 2012

Hanukkah Celebrations Each Night!

All over campus!  7:00 am – 11:00 pm
Each night of Hanukkah we will celebrate in a different location, with each night being sponsored by a different part of the Bard community. Each night will feature candle-lighting plus something special. ALL ARE INVITED!

Sat. Dec. 8, 8 pm JSO latke and doughnut bash, Beit Shalom Salaam (Basement of Village A)

Sun. Dec. 9, 6:00 pm at Festival of Lights, Bard Chapel

Mon. Dec. 10, 6:30 pm, Kosher-Halal Neighborhood (Village K)

Tues. Dec. 11, 6:00 pm, 1st floor of Village C, latkes prepared by the Associate Dean of Students

Wed. Dec. 12, 5:30 pm sponsored by Julie Silverstein/Student Activities at the Campus Center Room 214

Thurs. Dec. 13, 4:30pm at the Hannah Arendt Center. We'll light candles, cook together and then eat and talk about Arendt and Hanukkah.

Fri. Dec. 14, 3:45 pm, sponsored by Leon Botsein at the President’s home

Sat. Dec. 15, 8 pm sponsored by J Street U at Beit Shalom-Salaam (Basement of Village A)

Sponsored by: Jewish Life
Contact: David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
  Friday, December 7, 2012

Eight Great Nights of Hanukkah!

All over campus!  6:00 am – 10:00 pm
Each night of Hanukkah we will celebrate in a different location, with each night being sponsored by a different part of the Bard community. Each night will feature candle-lighting plus something special. ALL ARE INVITED!

Sat. Dec. 8, 8 pm JSO latke and doughnut bash, Beit Shalom Salaam (Basement of Village A)

Sun. Dec. 9, 6:00 pm at Festival of Lights, Bard Chapel

Mon. Dec. 10, 6:30 pm, Kosher-Halal Neighborhood (Village K)

Tues. Dec. 11, 6:00 pm, 1st floor of Village C, latkes prepared by the Associate Dean of Students

Wed. Dec. 12, 5:30 pm sponsored by Julie Silverstein/Student Activities at the Campus Center Room 214

Thurs. Dec. 13, 4:30pm at the Hannah Arendt Center: We'll light candles, cook together and then eat and talk about Arendt and Hanukkah.

Fri. Dec. 14, 3:45 pm, sponsored by Leon Botsein at the President’s home

Sat. Dec. 15, 8 pm sponsored by J Street U at Beit Shalom-Salaam (Basement of Village A)

Contact: David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
  Monday, November 26, 2012

Divine and Popular Sovereignty in Islamic Political Thought after the Arab Spring

Olin 102  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Andrew March
Associate Professor of Political Science, Yale University

Since the 2011 revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, political life in those countries has been dominated by so-called "moderate Islamist" parties. These parties proclaim the acceptance of constitutional democracy and political power-sharing, while at the same time endorsing shari'a law as the ultimate source of legitimate power in a Muslim country. This talk approaches the paradox of Islamic democracy through the lens of the concept of sovereignty in contemporary Islamic political theology. What does it mean to hold that both God and the people can be said to be "sovereign" and what unresolved paradoxes remain at the level of theory?



Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Political Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Mairaj Syed  845-758-7382  msyed@bard.edu
  Friday, November 16, 2012

Buddhism and Food Culture in Korea

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Seonjae Sunim
Renown South Korean Buddhist nun, scholar, and master chef Seonjae Sunim comes to Bard College to share her philosophy of dietary and spiritual well-being. Considered an icon in Korean temple cuisine, Seonjae will share her experience as an advocate of a return to locally-informed traditional Korean food culture and environmentally-conscious cooking. She may even share a recipe for kimch’i made of vegetables grown in the Hudson Valley.
Sponsored by: Anthropology Program; Asian Studies Program; Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Environmental and Urban Studies Program; Political Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Ken Haig  845-758-6051  khaig@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 2, 2012

"Between God and Green: How Evangelicals Are Cultivating a Middle Ground on Climate Change"

Reem-Kayden Center Room 102  Katharine K. Wilkinson, DPhil

How Evangelicals Are Cultivating a MIddle Ground on Climate Change


Sponsored by: Environmental and Urban Studies Program; Experimental Humanities Program; Religion Program
Contact: mwilliam@bard.edu